A Weight-Loss Journey with St. Thérèse of Lisieux

bitofessence:

32 days

bitofessence:

32 days

(Source: vegan-hippie)

sagansense:

Gorgeous Images Of Far-Away Galaxies Taken With A Film Camera
Photograph Siri Kaur has produced some gorgeous science art. She photographed galaxies in long exposure on film at the Kitt Peak National Observatory, and then altered the color and depth in the dark room.  These are the gorgeous results. Source: Design Taxi.

via abluegirl

eyehasnotseen, earhasnotheard

What Godhasready forthoselove Him…

Slip-knots in the fabric  Of passing Tuesdays    Have taught me how right    Jesus was     Singing his swan song on Calvary.My DNA knows that death does not have    Anything like the final word…And when an image arisesOf that passing moment:         Not light          Not Aunties and Grannies, not yet             Not puff-clouds nor harpsichordsOnly the tortured, suffering faceOf the Maid of Normandy—    My final guide       Into long-sought but unknown territory.

Slip-knots in the fabric

Of passing Tuesdays

Have taught me how right

Jesus was

Singing his swan song on Calvary.

My DNA knows that death does not have

Anything like the final word…

And when an image arises

Of that passing moment:

Not light

Not Aunties and Grannies, not yet

Not puff-clouds nor harpsichords

Only the tortured, suffering face

Of the Maid of Normandy—

My final guide

Into long-sought but unknown territory.

(Source: mymotherschild)

Day 55 — The Little Weigh with St. Thérèse of Lisieux

The days slip away when one is away from home, traveling, living out of a suitcase, and relying on the hospitality of one’s hosts. But today is the first of August, and I have made the commitment to hold myself accountable on the first of each month with a “little weigh-in” of sorts.

So, in these 55 days of journeying very consciously with Saint Thérèse as my guide, thirty-one pounds are gone. My goal is to go farther, to put my trust again and again each day in Little Thérèse, and to do so with as much joyfulness as I can muster.

"It is the little things done for love that charm the heart of our good God." —St. Thérèse of the Child Jesus and the Holy Face

catholicloveblog:

No greater pride is there than judging others, nor is there anything for which God abandons man, more than for judging others. Everywhere in the Scriptures God tells us clearly not to judge others, but rather ourselves. Likewise spiritual writers condemn this fault of judging others with so 
many examples that the day would sooner be over than we could relate just a few of them. Take this thought for a conclusion: the beginning of the ruin of the spiritual life is judging others.
— Saint Anthony Mary Zaccaria from a sermon 


To see others as God sees them, that is our vocation…

catholicloveblog:

No greater pride is there than judging others, nor is there anything for which God abandons man, more than for judging others. Everywhere in the Scriptures God tells us clearly not to judge others, but rather ourselves. Likewise spiritual writers condemn this fault of judging others with so
many examples that the day would sooner be over than we could relate just a few of them. Take this thought for a conclusion: the beginning of the ruin of the spiritual life is judging others.


— Saint Anthony Mary Zaccaria from a sermon 

To see others as God sees them, that is our vocation…

(Source: catholicknight)

Archbishop Fulton Sheen: PRAYING THE ROSARY

by-grace-of-god:

J.M.J.

From the earliest days, the Church asked its faithful to recite the one hundred and fifty Psalms of David. This custom still prevails among priests, who recite some of these Psalms every day. However, it was not easy for anyone to memorize the one hundred and fifty Psalms. Then, too, before the invention of printing, it was difficult to procure a book of the Psalms. That is why certain important books like the Bible had to be chained like telephone books are today; otherwise people would have run off with them.

Incidentally, this gave rise to the stupid lie that the Church would not allow anyone to read the Bible, because it was chained. The fact is, it was chained just so people could read it. The telephone book is chained, too, but it s more consulted than any book in modern civilization!

The people who could not read one hundred and fifty Psalms wanted to do something to make up for it. Therefore, they substituted one hundred and fifty Hail Marys. They broke up these one hundred and fifty, in the manner of the Acathist, into fifteen decades, or series of ten. Each part was to be said while meditating on a different aspect of the Life of Our Lord.

To keep the decades separate, each one of them began with the Our Father and ended with the Doxology of Praise to the Trinity.

St. Dominic, who died in 1221, received from the Blessed Mother the command to preach and to popularize this devotion for the good of souls, for conquest over evil, and for the prosperity of Holy Mother Church and thus gave us the Rosary in its present classical form.

…It is objected that there is much repetition in the Rosary because the Lord’s Prayer and the Hail Mary are said so often; therefore some say it is monotonous.

That reminds me of a woman who came to see me one evening after instructions. She said, “I would never become a Catholic. You say the same words in the Rosary over and over again, and anyone who repeats the same words is never sincere. I would never believe anyone who repeated his words and neither would God.”

I asked her who the man was with her. She said he was her fiancé. I asked: “Does he love you?” “Certainly, he does,” “But how do you know?” “He told me.” “What did he say?”

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Talk to your Mama (for that is what St. Therese felt constrained to call her as their relationship deepened), and tell her over and over that you love her!

Our temptations in the desert can come on city streets  Just as our encounters with women at the well  Can come at subway stations…Lepers call out to us from the backs of taxis  And in crowded squares, amid the vendors,  We see prodigal daughters and sons panhandling     Their ways home.

Our temptations in the desert can come on city streets

Just as our encounters with women at the well

Can come at subway stations…

Lepers call out to us from the backs of taxis

And in crowded squares, amid the vendors,

We see prodigal daughters and sons panhandling

Their ways home.

(Source: abymazon)

Day 43 — The Little Weigh with St. Therese of Lisieux

One hundred degree heat, walking through a crowded city, not enough water—and a short moment or two to feel something approaching empathy with that vast majority of the world which does not know whether sufficient food or sufficient clean water will be on hand before the sun goes down.

There is something both obscene and humbling about walking through crowds of the poor as a person who is so noticeably overweight…and I give you thanks Almighty God, for being thus humbled, for being brought closer to you.

With the grace of God and with help from St. Therese, I am continuing to eat purposefully each day, to avoid the consumption of empty calories, and to exercise more joyfully.
May my slow but steady drop in weight be mirrored by the slow but growing prayerfulness in my soul.